Top five reasons I am starting a frozen yogurt business.

 1.  Seamed like a good idea at the time.

 When I first saw PinkBerry in LA September 2006 I was surprised at how popular it was and how good the yogurt taste,  plus it had  the whole organic, low calorie, healthy vibe to it.  This was also before the press started talking about them, and the start of the yogurt wars. Basically I thought this was a good business and I should bring it to Marin county before they do.

2. The yogurt business looked simple to build and simple to run.

Looked, is the key word here.  Everything  had a new learning curve from negotiating leases with property managers and landlords,  to dealing with health department codes, and building departments. To building the store and not driving my neighbors crazy with noise.   (It is still unclear  to me,  how I’m going to operate a retail store.)

3. The appeal of cash transactions.

 I’ve been  involved in the construction business for 22 years, and the thought of having a business that gets paid per transaction is very appealing.   No more accounts receivable, payment terms, or collection phone calls.

4. Having a business that can be run by teenagers.

Writing this does not seem to be a benefit, but the appeal was that the learning curve for  making frozen yogurt is not as steep, compared to the construction business.  Plus, there is the added benefit that employees are less likely to get hurt making frozen yogurt compared to working with heavy equipment, standing on roofs, or working from ladders.

5. Looked like a fun business to get into.

After the Internet bubble burst,  I decided I would not invest in businesses I had no control over,  and I would just put money back into my business, or look at other businesses to start. So rather then pay someone else to go into a crazy venture and risk stock holders money, I decided to invest in my own crazy Ideas.  Plus, one of my mentors George Leonard, always told me, “Life is all about learning, never stop learning” Starting this business is just another learning opportunity.

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 1.  Seamed like a good idea at the time.

 When I first saw PinkBerry in LA September 2006 I was surprised at how popular it was and how good the yogurt taste,  plus it had  the whole organic, low calorie, healthy vibe to it.  This was also before the press started talking about them, and the start of the yogurt wars. Basically I thought this was a good business and I should bring it to Marin county before they do.

2. The yogurt business looked simple to build and simple to run.

Looked, is the key word here.  Everything  had a new learning curve from negotiating leases with property managers and landlords,  to dealing with health department codes, and building departments. To building the store and not driving my neighbors crazy with noise.   (It is still unclear  to me,  how I’m going to operate a retail store.)

3. The appeal of cash transactions.

 I’ve been  involved in the construction business for 22 years, and the thought of having a business that gets paid per transaction is very appealing.   No more accounts receivable, payment terms, or collection phone calls.

4. Having a business that can be run by teenagers.

Writing this does not seem to be a benefit, but the appeal was that the learning curve for  making frozen yogurt is not as steep, compared to the construction business.  Plus, there is the added benefit that employees are less likely to get hurt making frozen yogurt compared to working with heavy equipment, standing on roofs, or working from ladders.

5. Looked like a fun business to get into.

After the Internet bubble burst,  I decided I would not invest in businesses I had no control over,  and I would just put money back into my business, or look at other businesses to start. So rather then pay someone else to go into a crazy venture and risk stock holders money, I decided to invest in my own crazy Ideas.  Plus, one of my mentors George Leonard, always told me, “Life is all about learning, never stop learning” Starting this business is just another learning opportunity.

 1.  Seamed like a good idea at the time.

 When I first saw PinkBerry in LA September 2006 I was surprised at how popular it was and how good the yogurt taste,  plus it had  the whole organic, low calorie, healthy vibe to it.  This was also before the press started talking about them, and the start of the yogurt wars. Basically I thought this was a good business and I should bring it to Marin county before they do.

2. The yogurt business looked simple to build and simple to run.

Looked, is the key word here.  Everything  had a new learning curve from negotiating leases with property managers and landlords,  to dealing with health department codes, and building departments. To building the store and not driving my neighbors crazy with noise.   (It is still unclear  to me,  how I’m going to operate a retail store.)

3. The appeal of cash transactions.

 I’ve been  involved in the construction business for 22 years, and the thought of having a business that gets paid per transaction is very appealing.   No more accounts receivable, payment terms, or collection phone calls.

4. Having a business that can be run by teenagers.

Writing this does not seem to be a benefit, but the appeal was that the learning curve for  making frozen yogurt is not as steep, compared to the construction business.  Plus, there is the added benefit that employees are less likely to get hurt making frozen yogurt compared to working with heavy equipment, standing on roofs, or working from ladders.

5. Looked like a fun business to get into.

After the Internet bubble burst,  I decided I would not invest in businesses I had no control over,  and I would just put money back into my business, or look at other businesses to start. So rather then pay someone else to go into a crazy venture and risk stock holders money, I decided to invest in my own crazy Ideas.  Plus, one of my mentors George Leonard, always told me, “Life is all about learning, never stop learning” Starting this business is just another learning opportunity.